LOCATING COVERED BRIDGES and WATER WHEEL GRIST MILLS

The 1857 Humpback covered bridge, Covington, Virginia.
Comprehensive Covered Bridge List
Note: This comprehensive listing (and the state listings below) is just that - all covered bridges are listed, including modern bridges with any kind of cover that are not true, authentic covered bridges, such as a homeowner's driveway bridge, pedestrian bridges, at city park entrances, etc. But there are plenty of genuine, nostalgic and photogenic old bridges in these lists.

Comprehensive Mill List         Mill photos
Note: The above general mill web sites include all mills, with or without water wheels, both photogenic and non-photgenic, and are suggested for research and to view photos of the mills so you can decide if they might meet your photo expectations. (You may find some of the non-water wheel mills to be very rustic and photogenic.) By far the majority of mills in these lists have been converted to private homes or businesses, and only a relative few with water wheels remain that are still photogenic, or may be secluded from view on private property.

If a covered bridge or mill is borderline in authentic appearance (barricades or modern walkways in front of the bridge, mill race is gone, modern signs on the mill, etc.) you may be able to use techniques such as photographing at a high ISO with noise or grain, converting to high contrast, cloning out small non-authentic items (such as the barricades or signs), removing modern backgrounds, etc. to create a nostalgic looking photo.

* Denotes a covered bridge and mill together or close by.
ALABAMA
Alabama Covered Bridges
Bridges to the Past
Covered bridge map: 800-252-2262

* Childersburg: Kymulga Bridge Mill, 1860’s turbine powered mill (no water wheel) beside the 1861 Kymulga covered bridge.

Cullman: Clarkston Mill (very near to the Clarkson / Legg covered bridge).
Jacksonville: Alderholt Mill
Opelika: Bean’s Grist Mill, 1874.

ARKANSAS
Burns Park covered bridge

Hardy: Water Wheel Mill

CALIFORNIA
California Covered Bridges
Butte, Newman and Yuba Counties

Calistoga: Bale's Grist Mill and 2nd web site, 1846.

CONNECTICUT
Connecticut Covered Bridges
Covered Bridges of the Northeast / Connecticut

Johnsonville: Johnsonville Mill

DC
Pierce Mill

DELAWARE
Delaware Covered Bridges

Wilmington: Greenbank Mill

GEORGIA
Georgia Covered Bridges

Clayton County: Mundy’s Mill
Cleveland: Johnson Mill
Dillard: Barker’s Creek Mill and 2nd web site, 1944.
Dekalb: Stome Mt. Mill
Gainsville: Healan Mill
Homer: Ragsdale Mill and 2nd web site.
Jackson County: Hurricane Shoals Mill
Laurenceville: Swann’s Mill and 2nd web site, circa 1870s.
Linvale: Linvale Mill
Marietta: Lefler Mill / Pine Run Mill and 2nd web site.
Mt. Airy: Laudermilk / Hazel Creek Mill and 2nd web site. On private property, but the owner (Robert) is agreeable to photos if permission is asked. The light is best in the afternoon.
Woodstock: Sixes Mill / Gresham's Mill and 2nd web site. A non-working replica mill, nevertheless it makes a nice photograph. On private property but can be photographed from the road side with a small tele.

ILLINOIS
Illinois Covered Bridges

Franklin Grove: Franklin Creek Grist Mill
Oak Brook: Graue Mill

INDIANA
Indiana Covered Bridges

* Bridgeton: Bridgeton Mill, 1823 turbine mill (rebuilt in 1870), beside 1868 covered bridge over Big Raccoon Creek.
Corydon: Squire Boone’s Mill, circa early 1800s, rebuilt 1980.
* Mansfield: Mansfield Roller Mill, 1820, beside a covered bridge.
Mitchell: Spring Mill Village Grist Mill

IOWA
Iowa Covered Bridges

KENTUCKY
Kentucky Covered Bridges

Somerset: Old Mill Springs Mill

MAINE
Maine Covered Bridges
Covered Bridges of the Northeast / Maine

MARYLAND
Havre de Grace: Rock Run Grist Mill (1794, refurbished late 1800s)
Norrisville: Amos Mill, circa 1770S, extremely rustic and photogenic.
Williamsport Station: McMahon’s Mill

MASSACHUSETTS
Massachusetts Covered Bridges
Covered Bridges of the Northeast / Massachusetts

Granville: Mill in the Meadow
South Sudbury: Wayside Inn Grist Mill

MICHIGAN
Michigan Covered Bridges
The Bridges web site

Parshallville: Tom Walker’s Grist Mill

MINNESOTA
Minnesota Covered Bridges

MISSISSIPPI
Enterprise: Carol Richardson Gristmill (1857 mill moved here from Georgia in 1987), by the Chunky River. From I-59 about 10 miles south of Meridian, take Exit 142, go right on Meehan-Savoy Road, then left on Dunn's Falls Rd. for about 3 miles to the Dunn's Falls Water Park, 6890 Dunn's Falls Rd.
Port Gibson: Grand Gulf Mill

MISSOURI
Missouri Covered Bridges

Mills of Ozark County
Centerville: Reed Spring Mill
Greer: Falling Spring Mill
* Bufordville: Bollinger Mill, a turbine mill but beside a covered bridge.
Tecumseh: Dawt Mill, 1897.
Hodgson Mill, 1894.
Zanoni Mill (and Inn), 1905. (Map)

NEW HAMPSHIRE
New Hampshire Covered Bridges
Covered Bridges in New Hampshire
New Hampshire Covered Bridges web site
Covered Bridges of the Northeast / New Hampshire

Littleton: Littleton Grist Mill, 1798.

NEW JERSEY
New Jersey Covered Bridges

Clinton: Clinton Mill / Red Mill and 2nd Web Site.
Lambertville: Somerset Roller Mill, circa 1739.
Millbrook: Millbrook Mill, 1848 (rebuilt 1990s).
Morristown: Cooper Gristmill, 1826.

NEW MEXICO
Las Vegas: La Cueva Mill, 1870s.

NEW YORK
New York Covered Bridges
New York State Covered Bridge Society
Washington and Rensselaer County Covered Bridges
Covered Bridges of the Northeast / New York

Avon: Malone’s Mill
Cobleskill: Caverns Creek Grist Mill (and museum).
New Hope: New Hope Mill

NORTH CAROLINA
North Carolina Covered Bridges

Bakersville / Hawk: Dellinger Grist Mill and 2nd web site.
Boone: Winebarger's Mill, 1911.
Catawba: Murray’s Mill , 1913.
Cherokee: The Old Mill
Cherry Field: Morgan’s Mill
Greensboro: Bailes Old Mill
Montgomery County: Loafer’s Glory Mill
Newton: Murray’s Mill, near Bunker Hill covered bridge, & Map.
Oak Ridge: Old Mill of Guilford and 2nd web site, 1820.
Raleigh: Yates Mill and 2nd web site, 1750s, very photogenic.
Rhonda: Tharpes Mill
Rutherford County: Hamrick Mill
Swain County: Bryson City Mill
Waynesville: Francis Mill

OHIO
Ohio Covered Bridges

Loudonville: Wolf Mill
* Clifton: Clifton Mill and covered bridge, 2nd Web Site.
Sandusky: Addington Mill
Garrettsville: Garretts Mill, 1804. (A working mill with a restaurant but restaurant can be avoided for an authentic photo.)
Miami County: Hoover Mill

OREGON
Oregon Covered Bridges
Oregon Covered Bridges DOT web site
Covered Bridges of Cottage Grove, Oregon

PENNSYLVANIA
Pennsylvania Covered Bridges
Covered Bridges of the Northeast / Pennsylvania
Columbia County Covered Bridges
Greene County Covered Bridges
Covered Bridges of Lancaster County

* Bedford County: Jackson Mill, no water wheel but beside a covered bridge.
Fawn Grove: Garvine’s Mill, circa early 1800s.
* Kutztown: Kuntz Mill, a turbine mill beside a covered bridge.
Mill Bridge Village: Herr Mill, circa 1760.
Perryopolis: George Washington’s Grist Mill , 1776.
Roaring Springs: Bare Mill
Somerset County: Klines Mill
Washington County: Brants’s Mill (on a private road).

RHODE ISLAND
Rhode Island Covered Bridges

Washington County: Exeter Mill
Washington County: Gilbert Mill and Hammond Mill, both mills side by side.

SOUTH CAROLINA
South Carolina Covered Bridges

Easley: Golden Creek Mill and 2nd Web Site, 1825.
Pendleton: Timm's Mill and 2nd Web Site.
Pickens: Hagood's Mill and 2nd Web Site, circa 1830.
Westminster: Ramey Mill

TENNESSEE
Tennessee Covered Bridges

Belvidere / New Salem: Falls Mill / Falls Creek Mill and 2nd Web Site, 1873. Best photographed in overcast, or in late afternoon to get even lighting on the water wheel side.
Burns: Old Spencer Mill
Cades Cove Cades Cove Mill
Danbridge: French Mill, very photogenic.
Gatlinburg: Lindsey Mill
Gatlinburg: Moores Mill
Gatlinburg: Teague Mill
Norris: Norris Mill, extremely photogenic.
Pigeon Forge: Dollywood / Silver Dollar Mill
Pigeon Forge: Dunn's Mill
Pigeon Forge: The Old Mill, 1800s. (Now the The Old Mill Restaurant, but presents authentic appearance from river side).
Roane County: Cross-Eyed Cricket Mill
Sevierville: Blowing Cave Mill
Tazewell: Johnson's Mill
Townsend: Townsend Mill

TEXAS
Waco: Homestead Heritage Grist Mill

UTAH
Salt Lake City: Manti Fort Mill, 1996 rebuild of 1853 mill.
Stansbury Park: Benson Grist Mill

VERMONT
Vermont Covered Bridges
Vermont Bridges
Vermont's Covered Bridges
Covered Bridges of the Northeast / Vermont

Londonderry: Bob's Water Mill
* Turnbridge: Turnbridge Mill, no water wheel but is by a covered bridge.

VIRGINIA
Virginia Covered Bridges

Abingdon: White’s Mill, extremely photogenic.
Abingdon: Park’s Mill
Big Island: Trevey’s Mill
Botetourt County: Tinker Mill
Collierstown: Potter-Wade’s Mill
Columbia Furnace / Liberty Furnace: Liberty Furnace Mill
Craigsville: Craigsville Mill and 2nd web site, mid 1800s, with huge 39 foot wheel.
Dayton: Ottobine Roller Mill
Dayton: Silver Lake Mill
Edinburg: Lantz Mill
Great Falls: Colvin Run Mill, circa 1810.
Floyd: Pine Creek Mill and 2nd web site, 1913.
Floyd: Roberson’s / Robinson Grist Mill Forestville / Timberville: Forestville / Zirkel Mill, circa 1760.
Leesburg: Aldie Mill and 2nd web site, 1809, two water wheels.
Lowesville: Woodson’s Mill
Lynchburg: Brightwell Mill and 2nd web site.
Meadows of Dan: Mabry Mill and 2nd Web Site.
New Market: Arbogast Mill, very photogenic.
Paint Bank: Tingler’s Mill
Patrick County: Goblintown Grist Mill, circa 1850.
Rockbridge County: Wade-Kennedy Mill
Rustburg: Bear Creek Mill, very photogenic.
Sperryville: Fletcher’s Mill
Staunton: McCormick’s Mill and 2nd web site, circa 1800.
Timberville: Forrestville Mill / Zirkle Mill, circa 1760
Tyro: Tyro Mill

WASHINGTON
* Woodland: Cedar Creek Grist Mill / Rec Bird Mill, 1876, by covered bridge. No visible water wheel but very photogenic.

WEST VIRGINIA
West Virginia Covered Bridges

Clifftop: Glade Creek Mill, extremely photogenic.
Hillsboro: McNeel / Mill Point Mill, 1865.
Laurel Hill: Meadow Run Grist Mill, 1784.

Williamsport: Lyon's Mill
Zenith: McClung's Mill

WISCONSIN
Wisconsin Covered Bridges

Augusta: Dell’s Mill (and museum), 2nd Web Site, 1864. Best view is from the adjacent bridge.
Iowa County: Hyde's Mill

Back to Top